Posture: The Attitude A Person Has Toward a Subject

Come, let us bow down in worship,
let us kneel before the LORD our Maker;
for he is our God
and we are the people of his pasture,
the flock under his care.

(Psalm 95:6-7 NIV)

What posture do you most often use when you approach God? I often sit in His presence. Kneeling, bowing and prostrating myself before Him are rare postures. I am expressive, so in worship I will raise my hands, but not everyone feels comfortable being demonstrative in these ways.

So why would we change our posture during our quiet time? I think the definition of posture gives us a clue. My attitude toward God can become casual, when I sit in my chair day after day. But when I change my posture, I have to think about the position and how I am presenting myself before God. Kneeling, bowing, opening my hands in surrender and laying myself out flat before God, each represent various levels of humility. I find that kneeling tends to make me feel more serious before God. 

In some of my most desperate times I have placed myself flat on the floor, just being still before God, especially when I don’t have the words to pray.

Pam Farrel asserts “Praying in a position that is not the norm for you can change your heart, not just your body position.” 

©Pam Farrel from 30 Ways to Wake Up Your Quiet Time (IVP). For more devotional books by Pam http://www.Love-wise.com


How do you think your posture changes your heart? Do you find it difficult to change positions before God? Are you willing to take the lower position to give God the higher glory?


Linking up with Soli Deo Gloria Party

13 thoughts on “Posture: The Attitude A Person Has Toward a Subject

  1. I usually sit at my kitchen table, where I have a cup of tea, read God's Word, and write in my journal (which, for me is prayer)…..and often with quiet Baroque or Renaissance music lilting in the background. I am approaching God as my Friend and intimate Beloved, as the Bible suggests. He is also a fearsome, awesome God, and like you, occasionally, I have laid prostrate before Him. When I wrote my book, daily I would kneel and bow down in my bedroom, hands upturned, asking Him to fill me with words I know I didn't have to write His message for women. In church sometimes I (rather shyly) raise my hands or upturn them. I attend a Presbyterian church, and we are far less demonstrative as a congregation. I don't want my actions to detract others from worship. And yet, I believe that lifting my hands in praise is biblical. Pam's point throughout the book, which I h ave read and enjoyed, is to be creative in worshiping our creative God. I love what she and you are doing.LoveLynni

  2. I have noticed times when sitting will not do and He is calling me to a different posture. I think our bodies and spirits are so intertwined — to miss this connection is to miss out on a blessing.Loved the encouragement you left at our newest SDG member. Thank you for being beautiful and lovely.

  3. Thanks Jen! I felt so welcomed last year…it is a joy to welcome others! I agree our bodies, minds and spirits feed off of each other…sometimes sitting gets me takes away from the awe of who God really is! Kneeling reminds me that He is my holy Maker!

  4. Lynni- I love how your quiet time incorporates several sensate qualities…tea, music, writing…and approaching God with His character and desire for us often can dictate what posture we approach Him…sitting across a table with a Friend or bowing before His holiness…amazing God that allows for us to approach Him just as we are with all of our hearts, souls, minds and body!

  5. Hi Kel! Our posture in prayer is an interesting thing. I can't kneel anymore, so sitting is really what I do the most of. A learned man told me that we can kneel in our minds, or lay prostrate, and that is fine too.Blessings!Ceil

  6. Many times I am so drawn to kneel or lay face down before him that I cannot remain seated! When I am up against my own limitations to change a situation, or when I have miserably failed someone(s) or my own wretchedness paralyzes me, wailing and moaning in desperation I am seek the Saviour. But what if I just came before him on my knees or laid before him without a request? And turned my head to just listen? That posture might just change our "conversation." Amen!

  7. I agree when we position ourselves in posture that is not our norm…it is definitely conducive to listening rather than talking…God quiets us as we lay ourselves out before Him!

  8. Good reminder to me about posture…I believe my posture is often times too casual and does not correlate with what I believe in my heart about the Lord. A casual posture does show that I'm comfortable with Him. But perhaps I also need to incorporate posture to show awe. Blessings…

  9. At home I have a "prayer chair" where I sit to pray. Not too long ago I suddenly became aware that I tended to "sprawl" instead of sitting up. Imagining Jesus sitting in the chair next to mine, I realized that I wouldn't sit in front of friends like that, and certainly if I could see Jesus when He is sitting with me in prayer, then I wouldn't sit like that. So, I've straightened up. At Mass we use standing, sitting, and kneeling. The kneeling is reserved for the most special parts of Mass — as the bread and wine are consecrated and become the Body and Blood of Christ, and right after we receive Him in Communion. "every knee shall bend"

  10. Jeanette- What a good reminder to imagine Jesus sitting across from us, when we pray. I like to imagine Him smiling at me…and I'm sure He appreciates when we sit up and let Him look into our eyes and hearts…thank you for reminding me that the postures during mass hold special significance…

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